MAY
22

Apple blames third-party batteries for exploding Beats headphones

The Beats headphones in question were reportedly an older model, purchased in 2014, that required extra batteries to function. The woman, who is remaining anonymous, said she was disappointed with Apple's decision because, "nowhere on the headphones - or their packaging - did it specify which brand of batteries should be used." Although the woman was burned on her face and hands, she was only seeking reimbursement to replace her headphones and items of clothing she was wearing. Engadget reached out to Apple for comment and we will update this post if we hear back.

Battery explosion mid-flight prompts passenger warning. Read more: https://t.co/ggCwATEiDI pic.twitter.com/YTTP9rEzFf

— ATSB (@atsbinfo)

This isn't the first time Beats has had a battery problem. In 2015, Apple recalled the Beats Pill XL speaker because it had a tendency to overheat and risk starting a fire in some rare cases. After the Australian woman's exploding Beats incident in February, Australian regulators issued a warning to leave battery powered devices stowed unless they're in use -- although it's unclear whether that policy would have actually prevented the explosion in this case. Anyhow, those less explosion-prone, zinc-based batteries can't arrive soon enough.

Original author: Dalton

Copyright

© FLIPBOARD - ORIGINAL AUTHORS

MAY
22

Revealed: Google tried to block media coverage of gender discrimination case

Google has tried to restrict reporting on a high-stakes gender discrimination case brought by the US government and fought to have the case thrown out of court because of a federal attorney’s comments to a reporter.

Court documents reveal that Google unsuccessfully argued that a judge should dismiss a lawsuit filed by the US Department of Labor (DoL), claiming that a government attorney may have violated ethics rules by doing an interview with the Guardian on 7 April.

The DoL has accused Google of systematically underpaying women, and the court battle centers on the company’s refusal to hand over salary data the government has requested.

The motion for a dismissal – which a judge rejected, in part citing the first amendment – sheds light on Google’s aggressive efforts to end the case at a time when the tech industry is facing increasing criticisms over sexist workplace cultures, gender discrimination and widespread pay disparities. Critics said it appeared that Google was attempting to limit media scrutiny with unusual tactics that raise free press concerns and seem to contradict the corporation’s public claims that it is committed to transparency and accountability in its efforts to promote equal pay.

Google also attempted to restrict press access during a hearing last month. Following a private meeting with the judge about the Guardian’s reporting, Google’s attorney requested that the proceeding be closed to the media before continuing, but a DoL attorney objected and the judge sided with the government.

Continue reading

Copyright

© FLIPBOARD - ORIGINAL AUTHORS

MAY
22

Facebook's secret guide on sex, violence, and hate speech leaked

File Photo

Facebook's secret rules and guidelines which lay out how moderators should tackle everything from self-harm to violence and hate-speech reveal the daily struggle the firm shoulders to control content sharing on the network.

Facebook Live is a livestreaming service originally intended to act as a rival of other livestreaming platforms including YouTube, Ustream, and Twitch. Recording and sharing video footage on-the-go has become popular in recent years, and with the expansion of Facebook's platform to include the feature, more of us than ever are either recording or tuning into our contact's streams.

However, criticism has been levied against Facebook since the launch of the platform as the livestreaming service has not only been used for benign videos but also to broadcast a number of violent incidents.

According to the Wall Street Journal, at least 50 acts of violence have been broadcast to the network's 1.8 billion users, including live suicides, murder, and sexual assaults.

The line between free speech and protecting users from such content is a difficult one to draw. Due to the size of the network, Facebook will often take a few hours -- with the assistance of reports -- to take down unacceptable footage and to help shoulder this task, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has promised to hire an additional 3,000 people on top of the 4,500 members of staff already monitoring livestreams and video uploads.

Continue reading

Copyright

© FLIPBOARD - ORIGINAL AUTHORS

MAY
21

Apple allegedly retaining deleted iCloud notes past the 30-day grace period

Russian software company ElcomSoft has made headlines in the past for making discoveries related to how Apple handles cloud data. Now, the company claims that Apple is holding onto deleted notes well past the thirty-day grace period during which they’re kept in the “Recently Deleted” folder…

Spigen TEKA RA200 Airpods Earhooks Cover

In a blog post, the company explains that using a version of its Phone Breaker tool, it extracted notes that were outside of the thirty-day grace period. ElcomSoft writes that its tool extracted nearly 50 notes that had been deleted by the user over a month ago. In fact, the oldest note it was able to retrieve was from 2012. What this means is that Apple is holding on to deleted notes for much longer than it should be and it’s unclear why.

ElcomSoft notes that the results vary on an account-by-account basis, with some accounts returning a large number of deleted notes, while others return fewer. The company says that in order to know the full breadth of this issue, it needs a larger test base.

We discovered that Apple apparently retains in the cloud copies of the users’ notes that were deleted by the user. Granted, deleted notes can be accessed on iCloud.com for some 30 days through the “Recently Deleted” folder; this is not it. We discovered that deleted notes are actually left in the cloud way past the 30-day period, even if they no longer appear in the “Recently Deleted” folder.

The research and software company has made several other discoveries in the past. Earlier this year, ElcomSoft reported that iCloud was storing more Safari history than it should, and Apple quickly corrected the flaw the same day.

Continue reading

Copyright

© FLIPBOARD - ORIGINAL AUTHORS

MAY
21

Facebook and Twitter 'harm young people's mental health'

Four of the five most popular forms of social media harm young people’s mental health, with Instagram the most damaging, according to research by two health organisations.

Instagram has the most negative impact on young people’s mental wellbeing, a survey of almost 1,500 14- to 24-year-olds found, and the health groups accused it of deepening young people’s feelings of inadequacy and anxiety.

The survey, published on Friday, concluded that Snapchat, Facebook and Twitter are also harmful. Among the five only YouTube was judged to have a positive impact.

The four platforms have a negative effect because they can exacerbate children’s and young people’s body image worries, and worsen bullying, sleep problems and feelings of anxiety, depression and loneliness, the participants said.

The findings follow growing concern among politicians, health bodies, doctors, charities and parents about young people suffering harm as a result of sexting, cyberbullying and social media reinforcing feelings of self-loathing and even the risk of them committing suicide.

Continue reading

Copyright

© FLIPBOARD - ORIGINAL AUTHORS

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://divethewebcreations.biz/

Advertisement