APR
14

Largest ecosystem restoration project in U.S. history provides model for climate adaptation | Growing Returns

Largest ecosystem restoration project in U.S. history provides model for climate adaptation | Growing Returns

In the wake of the $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan Act, President Biden’s administration has turned its sights from rescue to resilience in the newly announced American Jobs Plan that would invest $650 billion in rebuilding infrastructure nationwide. 

This proposed legislation is intended not only to mitigate significant and structural economic challenges, but also to repair and strengthen the systems on which we depend. This includes natural infrastructure to make our communities and ecosystems more climate resilient. 

On our coasts, revitalizing our economy must include building long-term resilience to climate change, sea level rise and hurricanes. In Louisiana, we already know exactly the kind of projects that the American Jobs Plan should support.      

Drawing inspiration from this large-scale restoration project

Louisiana loses on average a football field of coastal wetlands every 100 minutes. This land loss crisis coupled with sea level rise and stronger hurricanes pose an existential threat. Entire communities are at risk of displacement, and we risk the complete collapse of the Mississippi River Delta, an ecological treasure and economic engine. 

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APR
14

FBI Accesses Computers Around Country to Delete Microsoft Exchange Hacks

FBI Accesses Computers Around Country to Delete Microsoft Exchange Hacks

Hacking. Disinformation. Surveillance. CYBER is Motherboard's podcast and reporting on the dark underbelly of the internet.

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On Tuesday the Department of Justice announced the FBI was given approval to access hundreds of computers across the United States running vulnerable versions of Microsoft Exchange Server software to remove web shells left by hackers who had earlier penetrated the systems.

The news shows some of the more proactive steps law enforcement may take when faced with large scale hacking operations, and victims who are not willing or able to swiftly patch their systems.

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APR
11

People Who Deleted Their Social Media Share What It’s Like

Last month, Chrissy Teigen, the queen of online clapbacks, did something wholly unexpected: She left Twitter. (The model-turned-cookbook-author is so influential on the platform, she was dubbed the “Mayor of Twitter” by the company itself.)

“It’s time for me to say goodbye,” she wrote to her more than 14 million followers. “This no longer serves me as positively as it serves me negatively, and I think that’s the right time to call something.”

Teigen isn’t alone in walking away from one or more platforms for their mental well-being. (She’s still on Instagram, for what it’s worth.)

Kate Rosenblatt, a therapist and senior clinical manager at online therapy platform Talkspace, said that in recent months, many clients have deleted their social media or taken extended digital detoxes. Digital minimalism, they’re realising, can do wonders for your mental health.

“Post-pandemic, one year later, many clients have shared that since they’ve drastically increased their social media use this past year due to quarantine, they’re finding now is a great time to experiment with a digital detox,” Rosenblatt told HuffPost. “The vaccine is here and the world is slowly opening up again, so they can begin connecting with people safely IRL.”

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APR
09

cPanel & WHM® Version 96 now in CURRENT!

We are happy to announce that cPanel, L.L.C. has released cPanel & WHM Version 96 to the CURRENT tier!  To see what’s changing in this new version, check out our full release notes. If you have other questions or comments, join us on Discord, Reddit, or our Support Forums! Highlights of what’s new: AlmaLinux …

The post cPanel & WHM® Version 96 now in CURRENT! first appeared on cPanel Newsroom.
Original author: Tabby Worthington

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APR
09

Social platforms are finally trying new ideas for moderation

Social platforms are finally trying new ideas for moderation

Good morning! This Friday, the tech industry is trying some new things for content moderation, it looks like Amazon's union vote is going Amazon's way, the race is on to be the next WeChat, and there's been a shakeup at Box.

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The Big Story

Fresh ideas about moderation

The tech industry is finally getting past thinking about content moderation as a "leave it up or take it down" proposition. Companies are increasingly thinking more holistically, building new tools that give users more control and generally letting go of the idea that AI will solve all problems.

Twitch is expanding its policies to include some off-platform conduct, working with a third-party investigator to "take action against users for hateful conduct or harassment that occurs off Twitch services … when directed at members of the Twitch community."Pinterest also has some new guidelines, called the "Creator Code," meant to set the tone for how people operate on the platform. It's also giving creators more tools to remove content and promote good stuff.Facebook is all-in on context. It's testing a system that adds labels like "satire page" or "public official" to posts in the News Feed, in an effort to give people more information about what they're seeing and why.

The award for most out-there idea goes to Intel, which built a tool called Bleep that lets users decide how much bad stuff they want to encounter. It's designed for gamers in particular, and literally offers a slider that lets you decide how much misogyny or racism and xenophobia you're willing to hear in audio streams from other gamers: none, some, most, or all. Intel's AI will tune out any offending audio based on what you've chosen.

This sounds crazy (and kind of is), but it's a version of something a few folks have told me the industry needs more of: user controls. Rather than decide for users what they should encounter, platforms might instead try to get very good at classifying content and then letting users pick their own filters. (Though I don't know who in their right mind is turning "name-calling" up to "all.")

Some of these systems will work; most probably won't move the needle. But it's clear that the industry is thinking seriously — and sometimes for the first time — about what their policies say and how they're enforced. The answers are rarely as easy as "leave it up" or "take it down."

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